Installing Magento with MySQL Binary Logging On

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If you’re installing Magento and run across an issue where the database cannot create triggers due to binary logging being turned on, it may be as simple as updating the MySQL global dynamic variable log_bin_trust_function_creators to ON.

Here is an example of the error received while binary logging is on:

ERROR 1419 (HY000): You do not have the SUPER privilege and binary logging is
enabled (you *might* want to use the less safe log_bin_trust_function_creators
variable)

At a MySQL Prompt, you can confirm Binary Logging is being used by the following command:

SHOW VARIABES LIKE 'log_bin';
+---------------+-------+
| Variable_name | Value |
+---------------+-------+
| log_bin       | ON    |
+---------------+-------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

By setting the log_bin_trust_function_creators variable to ON, you’re allowing users with CREATE ROUTINE or ALTER ROUTINE privileges the ability to execute those commands within MYSQL with Binary Logging enabled.

SET GLOBAL log_bin_trust_function_creators=1;

While this is notedly less safe, it gets around the hurdle of installing Magento and once installation is finished, you can always reset the variable back with SET GLOBAL log_bin_trust_function_creators=0;.

An alternative to using this approach would be to grant the account being used to install Magento with Super Privileges within MySQL.

Magento Install Error – missing local.xml.template file

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If you ever run into the following error while installing Magento:

PHP message: PHP Fatal error: Call to a member function insert() on a non-object in .../app/code/core/Mage/Core/Model/Resource/Resource.php on line 133

Check to ensure you have the local.xml.template file in your app/etc/ folder.

This got me once while moving the code base from my development to test environment and then trying to install Magento from the test environment. My .gitignore file was configured to ignore this file when I pulled it into the test server from my repository.

PHP-FPM: Health Monitoring Status Page

Recently on our hosted site, some of our end users were receiving 502-Bad Gateway Errors sporadically. In researching the problem, we recognized that one of several web servers (being load-balanced across multiple servers) was constantly throwing 502-Bad Gateway errors back to the client. We discovered the NGINX process was running successfully, however the PHP-FPM process was hosed up and any php requests to that server was returning 502s.

To prevent this from occurring again, we’re updating our health monitoring (the load balancer monitors each server for availability) to test a PHP page instead of static content. This ensures both NGINX and PHP-FPM are up and responding to the clients, thus preventing the clients seeing 502 Bad Gateway errors thrown from NGINX.

PHP-FPM comes with it’s own health monitoring page that can be enabled through the configuration settings. By uncommenting (or adding) the pm.status_path setting in the etc/php-fpm.d/www.conf configuration file, and restarting the PHP-FPM process you should be able to invoke the page from a browser (ex: http://www.yourdomain.com/status).

Screen Shot 2015-05-21 at 1.17.17 PM

You can lock down the page from the public by only allowing requests from certain IP Addresses as shown below:

    location ~ ^/status$ {
        access_log on;
        allow 127.0.0.1;
        allow 172.16.x.x;
        deny all;
        include fastcgi_params;
        fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root${fastcgi_script_name};
        fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
    }

In the NGINX configuration above, we’re allowing only IP addresses 127.0.0.1 and 172.16.x.x (in our case an internal IP address) access to the /status page. The request is being forwarded to the PHP-FPM backend process and that process returns results similar to the following:

pool:                 www
process manager:      static
start time:           21/May/2015:11:05:10 -0400
start since:          10956
accepted conn:        455
listen queue:         0
max listen queue:     0
listen queue len:     0
idle processes:       49
active processes:     1
total processes:      50
max active processes: 3
max children reached: 0
slow requests:        0

Magento – 403 Forbidden on Post to app/etc/local.xml

Found several instances in the NGINX error log where an HTTP Post was being made to app/etc/local.xml.

Screen Shot 2015-05-20 at 5.06.46 PM

Turns out this is a feature!  Magento performs a sanity check by attempting a POST to this file regularly.  If the POST succeeds, the Administrator is notified on the backend.

This caught my eye when I noticed it in the log file, so I wanted to remind myself should I forget (which I often do).